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Moose River Restoration Project
Moose River Restoration Photos - Synopsis



See the previous days restoration photos on our flickr page

In the summer of 2009, CARP began efforts to restore ecosystem functions to the Moose River, including establishing fish passage past the Clementsport Dam. With support the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), CARP undertook a feasibility study on the Clementsport dam and determined that removing the dam and restoring the habitat was the most ecological and economically feasible option. CARP removed the dam and conducted important restoration work in September 2011. We will continue to monitor changes to the river’s morphology as well as fish species migration until the fall of 2013. The dam removal was funded by the Gulf of Maine Council on the Environment, NSLC Adopt a Stream, Nova Scotia Environment, Nova Scotia Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, Atlantic Salmon Conservation Foundation and the RBC Blue Water Leadership Grant

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The Moose River is a tributary of the Annapolis Basin, which is an embayment of the Bay of Fundy. The river is approximately 11 km in length, from its source at Lake Cady to where it empties into the Annapolis Basin at Clementsport. The watershed has a catchment of approximately 42 km². The Moose River has a confirmed history of supporting Atlantic salmon, good water quality, viable spawning habitat and interest among project partners to re-build stocks.


The area now know as the Clementport Dam has a long history of use, and during the 1980's, the Clementsport Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion re-constructed a 2.5m high dam across the river to provide a community swimming pool. The dam is located approximately 1.8 km upstream of where the river enters saltwater (Annapolis Basin). While a fishway was added to the dam in 1991, there have been on-going concerns over its effectiveness. The fishway is currently non-functional. Over the past five years, there has been waning local interest in swimming in the river, with the community park adjacent to the dam falling into a derelict condition. Considerable damage to the dam has been caused by winter ice and high spring flows undermining the structure, resulting in a complete barrier to migratory fish.

Clementsport Dam Removal and Restoration 2011 - 2011

Moose River Restoration Project Executive Summary - Feasibility Assessment, River Restoration at Clementsport Dam - 2010

The Moose River Feasibility Study

In the summer of 2009, Clean Annapolis River Project began efforts to restore ecosystem functions to the Moose River, including establishing fish passage past the Clementsport Dam. With support the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) (Award NA07NMF4630157) and the RBC Blue Water Project, CARP has undertaken a feasibility study on restoring fish passage past the Clementsport dam. The feasibility study, completed in August 2010, recommended the complete removal of the Clementsport dam and restoration of the site.

     

Executive Summary from Feasibility Study Report

Pre-restoration Monitoring

CARP is proposing to remove the Clementsport dam and its associated structures in the summer of 2011. Debris will be removed from the site, riverbanks stabilized and natural river channel established to ensure fish passage.

Watch this space for more updates as we get closer to construction.

Summary of the 2009 pre-restoration monitoring

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